Ava 19-026

Ava 19-026Ava 19-026

Profile

Ava came into RAGOM's care when her owner could no longer adequately care for all of his dogs. Ava is a petite, healthy girl who gave birth to 10 puppies in March 2019. Due to her limited socialization, Ava's forever home should have children who are age 13 or older, as well as a confident resident dog for Ava to learn from and comfort her when she is stressed. A physical fence is required to keep her safe.

At a Glance #19-026

Mixed Breed 2 years old
Female 45 lbs

Available as of June 26, 2019
Fostered in St. Paul, MN

Status: Adopt Me
Adoption fee: $400

Children ages 13+
Another dog REQUIRED
Not tested with cats
Physical fence required (no invisible fence)
Medium energy
Children ages 13+
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Another dog REQUIRED
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Not tested with cats
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Physical fence required (no invisible fence)
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Medium energy
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Profile

Ava came into RAGOM's care when her owner could no longer adequately care for all of his dogs. Ava is a petite, healthy girl who gave birth to 10 puppies in March 2019. Due to her limited socialization, Ava's forever home should have children who are age 13 or older, as well as a confident resident dog for Ava to learn from and comfort her when she is stressed. A physical fence is required to keep her safe.

Updates

Friday, September 6, 2019

Hello RAGOM land. Ava is confirmed to attend Goldzilla this Sunday. She will be walking in the Foster Showcase Parade. We also have plans for a mini-reunion with her original foster mom and her puppies.

We hope to see you there!

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Ava has had quite a summer! After recovering from ehrlichiosis, she went in for her spay and developed complications. In a rare twist, she developed a uterine stump infection from MRSP, which is a canine version of MRSA. This is a staph infection that is resistant to most antibiotics.

After multiple rounds of extremely strong antibiotics and surgery to remove the infected mass, Ava is on her way to being a healthy girl. 

Ava is getting bouncier and happier as the days pass. A neighbor heard her story and gave her a stuffed lamb doll. In spite of the e-collar, she does her best to try to play with the stuffy. Ava gets startled by voices and man-made sounds outdoors—so a fence is still required in her new home.

Inside the house, she shows very few anxieties when home with her people. House guests are finally less stressful for her as well! Visitors to the home are no longer terrifying, and she will even approach people and sniff their legs.

Ava has developed a very special style of cuddling we call "power snuggling" where she will use her entire body to snuggle. Ava is tentatively scheduled to attend Goldzilla in a few days. We hope to see you there.

Smiling in bed
Smiling in bed
Power snuggling
Power snuggling

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Hello! New foster mom here to update you on Ava’s progress. Ava is in a new foster home to help facilitate her weaning and the dispersal of her pups. The first two weeks in a new foster home were very stressful for little Ava.

Ava is very frightened by new environments, people, and situations. She is easily startled and needs a confident dog in her new home to help her overcome her fears and insecurities.

Ava would love to have a home where her people are around most of the time. She crates well with people around her. We are working on building her confidence so she can safely be left alone in a crate.

Due to her history, she may resource guard her humans, food, and water from other dogs. Ava has an easier time bonding to women, so foster dad had to work a little extra hard to gain her trust.

Nitty gritty

  • Weighs 45 pounds and is near her ideal weight.
  • Fence is required as she is a high flight risk.
  • Spayed! She has two more days in the cone of shame for her incision to completely heal.
  • Recovered from ehrlichiosis, a tick borne disease that is endemic in the south.
  • No storm anxiety.
  • Baby gates are meaningless! She will easily jump over a waist-high gate without batting an eyelash.
  • Allowed foster mom to give her a full pedicure—clipped her nails and trimmed the fur on her paws
  • Not a party dog—taking her to a bar, park, or pet store would be an exercise in terror.

Fun stuff

  • Adores eating ice cubes and thinks chewing on a water buffalo horn is a lot of fun.
  • Takes her medication if it’s covered in a little Neufchatel or cream cheese.
  • Learning how to run, play with toys, and get the zoomies.
  • Will wake up and rub her head on your lap in the most adorable way.
  • Would love to fall asleep curled up on your lap.

Ava had multiple challenges integrating into her new foster home. She arrived in the rain and was immediately stressed. She was separated from her ten pups, still had milk in her breasts, and was very nervous getting out of the car.

Her first few days, she sat in the back of her crate, carefully observing everything around her with big brown eyes. Foster mom got a little worried that Ava wasn’t blinking enough. It was as if her big eyes were saying “I am very frightened, I want to trust you, and I can’t do that just yet.”

To complicate matters, one of our resident dogs was too forward and unable to understand Ava’s need for space. So we had to enforce a boundary space for Ava with baby gates, pocket doors, and creative crate placement.

After two days of eating and drinking in the middle of the night, Ava finally began to eat in front of people and other dogs. Apparently, homemade chicken broth and bits of chicken breast were the ticket. She began to prance in the morning and wag her tail happily.

After a week of steady progress, she suddenly became sick! Ava stopped eating, was barely drinking, and was lethargic. So after she refused her second meal, off we went to the emergency vet. She was so frightened, she wouldn’t leave the car and she had to be carried inside the crate into the clinic.

While there, she was found to have a slight temperature and dehydration. After some fluid she was declared stable and came back home. The next morning, we went to her scheduled vet appointment. She traveled well in the car in a crate to the vet with our mellow resident dog, Mitchell, acting as her handsome canine escort.

She willingly left the car, entered the clinic, and immediately hid behind Mitchell in a corner. After some gentle coaxing, she let the vet examine her and take some blood. The vet awarded her with squeezy cheese!

Ava came back positive for ehrlichiosis, a tick borne disease that is easily treated by antibiotics. Her pregnancy must have kept the little bug in check. She came through her spay beautifully, finished all of her prescribed medications, and is now recuperating and well on her way to a new life.

This little peanut has had a tough start in life and hopes that you can be the one to give her the forever home she never knew she could have.

Ava 19-026
Ava 19-026
Ava 19-026

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Ava is eager for this business of being a mama to wrap up. She cannot be spayed until four weeks after she is done nursing, and we are busily trying to find homes for all ten of her babies. She has attempted to cut them off the milk supply since they were about three weeks old, but they are like ants on a melting Popsicle at a picnic.

Ava hanging out with her pups on a beautiful sunny day.
Ava hanging out with her pups on a beautiful sunny day.
Ava enjoys a peaceful rest with two of her puppies.
Ava enjoys a peaceful rest with two of her puppies.

Once Ava is spayed she can go to her forever home. Here’s what we’ve learned about Ava in the time we’ve had her.

She can be shy around new people and is slow to warm up to some, but when she chooses you to be her “person” she loves you unconditionally. As her foster mom, I have been that special person and she sticks to me like glue.

Ava likes to make a bed in the Rubbermaid tote full of puppy towels and blankets.
Ava likes to make a bed in the Rubbermaid tote full of puppy towels and blankets.

She loves to snuggle on the couch, and would probably enjoy sleeping in the bed right next to me if I would allow it. Instead she settles for the floor directly next to the bed. She will lay at my feet while I’m working on the computer or under the table while I’m eating.

Ava is part mountain goat. Just kidding, but we have found that she can jump out of a 4-foot exercise pen. If her new home has a fence, she will need to be monitored as she can leap a low fence in a single bound. The good news is that she is good on the leash and sticks close to her person.

Ava 19-026

Ava is smart especially when it comes to tracking down food. Back to that mountain goat aspect, she can climb up onto any counter to get at food that might tempt her.

Ava has free reign in our finished basement as that is where her puppies are currently housed. She has not gotten into any trash or chewed up anything other than knocking the puppies food bowl off a counter. She has also spent some time in a crate and tolerates that, although it’s not her favorite spot.

Coming from a hoarding situation with 15 dogs and living at our house with two other dogs, it is clear that Ava can coexist with other dogs. We have not found her to particularly engage with our dogs, but that could be due to the pregnancy hormones that have made her protective of her pups.

I think she could easily be an only dog or live peacefully with another non-alpha dog that didn’t want to play with her.

Hopefully we can make Ava available for adoption soon, after her puppies find homes and her pregnancy hormones are leveled out. She is ready for that special someone to call her own.

Ava 19-026
Ava 19-026

Tuesday, April 2, 2019

Beautiful Ava came into rescue as one of 13 dogs surrendered by an owner whose unspayed and unneutered pets started breeding to the point he could no longer care for all of them. Ava came to Minnesota on February 21, and within a few weeks Foster Mom was noticing some changes.

The vet confirmed Ava was pregnant and we welcomed 10 adorable puppies into RAGOM’s care on March 25. There are six males and four females, and they come in a delightful mix of coat colors. Who daddy is will remain a mystery.

Ava takes good care of her babies.
Ava takes good care of her babies.

For now Ava is busy caring for her babies, but both she and her puppies will be available for adoption soon. RAGOM will begin taking applications for puppies when they are around 4 weeks old (late April). They will be ready to go to their forever homes Memorial weekend. Ava should be able to follow shortly after.

Check back for updates!

Please Note: RAGOM will not be accepting applications for Ava’s puppies until the puppies are available for adoption and are listed on our Adoptable Dogs page.

Ava loves to lounge on the couch.
Ava loves to lounge on the couch.
Ava is a petite Golden mix. She loved eating ice and snow and is sad it's all melted now.
Ava is a petite Golden mix. She loved eating ice and snow and is sad it's all melted now.
Momma Ava with a few of her puppies the day she gave birth. It was hard work but she did great.
Momma Ava with a few of her puppies the day she gave birth. It was hard work but she did great.

Adopt Me: If you think Ava would be a good fit in your home, please review our adoption process. If you have already submitted an Inquiry for Application, email application@ragom.org with Ava's name, RAGOM number (19-026), the name you submitted under, and a sentence or two explaining why you feel your home would be a good match.