Duke 18-157

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Profile

Duke came to RAGOM from a humane society in Iowa when they realized he required hip surgery. Duke is recovering nicely from his first hip surgery and will require surgery on his other hip in the near future. Duke is basically a puppy in a big dog's body.

At a Glance #18-157

Golden Retriever Born: November 2017
Male 60 lbs

Status: Adopted

Profile

Duke came to RAGOM from a humane society in Iowa when they realized he required hip surgery. Duke is recovering nicely from his first hip surgery and will require surgery on his other hip in the near future. Duke is basically a puppy in a big dog's body.

Updates

Friday, December 7, 2018

We are very happy Duke has been adopted by a family who understands there are some dogs who need just a little extra help. He will have his dad and mom and a fur sister to keep him busy.

Duke has a large yard to run and play in and all sorts of wildlife who like to visit the field behind his yard. He will be starting obedience classes on Monday, which makes me extra happy.

We wish you all the very best!!

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

We have some big news... Duke did not require his second hip surgery. It was decided his first surgery was so successful and his other hip, although not a normal hip, would not be a candidate for the same surgery.

Duke will likely develop arthritis as he gets older, so he will need to keep his weight down and get plenty of exercise to improve his hip muscles. Dr. R removed all restrictions, so Duke is free to run and play like a normal, big puppy.

Duke struggled to understand the meaning of a leash, but took to a walk like a pro. His very first walk was 8 blocks, and when he got home, he immediately laid down for a quiet nap. After 8 weeks of rehabilitation and restrictions, it was wonderful to see how exercise was able to help with Duke’s pent-up energy.

Tuckered out after a nice walk.
Tuckered out after a nice walk.

Duke loves to be near us when we’re working around the house. He will usually stand in my way when I’m vacuuming or look in the toilet while I’m cleaning it; he is never very far away. Foster Mom and Dad were busy canning apple sauce, so Duke made himself comfortable on my feet

Kitchen helper.
Kitchen helper.

Although Duke has learned many new commands since being with us, he will need a forever home that is dedicated to obedience training to help him become the best boy.

He is doing great with our routine. As soon as he hears the morning alarm, he will come over to Foster Mom and pull my blankets down. It was pretty funny when it was warmer; now, not so much.

Duke likes to snuggle on my lap at night, so he will now regularly climb on my lap after supper. His forever home will need to allow him to have snuggle time. Duke is learning to snuggle with the resident dogs, too.

Sharing a nap with the resident dog.
Sharing a nap with the resident dog.

We are excited to open Duke up for adoption. We will be looking for a family with a large, fenced yard; willing to provide him with daily exercise; dedicated to obedience training; and able to understand a big boy who acts like a 2- to 3-month-old puppy. Duke will need a family who knows not every dog is perfect, but with time and dedication, they can be their very best.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Duke is doing very well in his foster home. He continues to need constant reminders not to use his teeth on a human, but he has come a long way and I’m very proud of him.

It will be extremely helpful when his hip surgeries are behind him and he is 100% healed. He has completed his 8-week rehabilitation on his first hip, so we have been allowing more activity, and I can honestly say he is a much better boy when he gets plenty of fresh air and exercise. That saying is true: A happy dog is a tired dog.

Duke is so smart and has learned very quickly how to stay; he will do a "sit and stay" for every meal. In fact, he will now trot over to his bowl and sit without being told and wait while we fill all three dog dishes. He will remain in a “stay” until you tell him “OK.” It only took 3 times for him to accomplish this training.

Duke has become Foster Mom’s snuggle boy by pulling himself up onto my lap while I watch TV.  Once he goes in for his second hip surgery, he won’t be able to snuggle again for several weeks, so I get to take advantage of it for now.

Lap dog
Lap dog

Duke has decided there must be another dog in the house--his reflection. He was so surprised one night when he walked past the sliding glass door and saw this new dog, and he sat there for hours just staring at himself. My husband and I were laughing so hard I could hardly take a picture of him. Now, every night, Duke will wait for the “new” dog to come to the door.

Reflection
Reflection

Duke will be going back up to the animal hospital soon for his second hip operation. I know he is in good hands and this will make his life so much better, but it will be hard to start over now that we have gotten to the point of watching him play a little outside. I keep reminding myself that once he gets through all of this, he will be better than ever and he’ll be able to have a completely normal life for the first time in his life

Monday, October 22, 2018

Please welcome Duke into the RAGOM family. Duke is an 11-month-old beauty with big brown eyes and a toothy grin.

Duke came into RAGOM from an Iowa humane society that realized they were not able to help this young boy. Duke has a serious case of hip dysplasia and required TPO surgery to correct the problem. Fortunately for Duke, RAGOM was able to step forward and provide the care he needed.

After surgery
After surgery
Healing hip
Healing hip

Duke is healthy and was neutered prior to coming into RAGOM. He previously lived with children, but is still learning not to use his teeth, so it’s best if he is in a home with older children.

Duke gets along OK with our resident dogs, but he could also be an only dog with no issue. Duke still needs to learn when our resident dogs tell him it’s enough that it’s time to stop his antics.

He is a strong chewer, so we switch bones every day so he doesn’t get bored.

Although he is house trained, we do not allow him to have free roam while we’re at work. The first few days of having to get Duke into his kennel were a challenge, until Foster Mom realized how much he likes peanut butter. Now, every morning, Duke happily goes to his kennel and waits for his peanut butter-filled bone.

Because Duke is still learning what “come” means, it would be best if he has a fenced yard.

Hanging out
Hanging out

Duke’s first hip surgery was a success, and he is doing very well with his rehabilitation. We are now at the point of doing stairs. It was interesting to learn he was either not familiar or very uncomfortable with the idea of going up and down steps. It took some prompting with his food bowl, but he is now going up and down stairs like a champion.

I’ll be a very happy foster mom when we are able to go for an actual walk so that Duke can release some of his pent-up energy; however, for now, we must be content doing stairs five times a day. Although I’ve tried walking Duke around the yard for his potty breaks, he does not know how to walk on a leash, and if he does not want to do something, he will just lay down.

It has become obvious to us this boy did not have any training in the early stages of his life. Thankfully, Duke is food-motivated and willing to learn. Duke and I spend time every day in training mode, and he is very quick to learn a new command.

Duke is now a pro at “sit,” “down,” and “shake,” and is getting really good at “stay.” We are still working on “leave it,” and “quiet,” and the necessary command “no.” Duke does not like to be told “no” and will usually lift his paw for you to hold or cover his face. It’s hard not to laugh at him, but he’s having to learn that “no” means “no” and he can’t do whatever he wants all the time.

Duke is really a puppy in a big boy's body. His mouthy behavior has dramatically improved, but he will still occasionally turn his head toward your hand and try to nip at you. With a quick and firm “no” as a reminder, he will stop in mid-turn.

Because Duke came from a home with children, I’m guessing they played a game of clothes tug-of-war while getting dressed. Needless to say, I have several shirts that are torn because Duke thought he should be able to grab my clothes and pull. This is where the “leave it” command has been helpful. We just need to get the idea to stick even if there is no food involved, but that will come with time.

Duke will be having his other hip operated on in the very near future, so we will be starting his rehabilitation all over again. I was certainly hoping for better news from his check-up, but he only has a small window of opportunity to get the surgery done.

On a happier note, once Duke is healed from his hip surgeries, he will be better than ever and able to live a true Golden Life, free of pain.

We are extremely fortunate to have the ability to help dogs like Duke, and this can only be done through generous donations. If you were thinking about donating to a dog in need, please consider our boy Duke.

Duke will not be available for adoption until he has recovered from his hip surgeries.